Showing 1– 10 of 22 results

  • Cadmium and Health Effects

    Though trace amounts of many metals are essential for the health of living things, there is no scientific evidence showing a nutritional role for cadmium. Is cadmium harmful to humans or ecosystems? Humans can be harmed by a single large exposure to cadmium, and by long-term exposure to higher-than-usual concentrations. Until the mid-1900s, cadmium had few industrial uses. People were rarely exposed to concentrated doses of cadmium and the metal was not recognized as a health concern. But as...
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  • Arsenic and our Health

    Studies in animal species provide strong evidence that arsenic is an essential trace element - at least for birds and mammals. When researchers completely eliminated arsenic from the diets of animals in experiments, the animals became ill; some developed reproductive problems. The offspring of these arsenic-deprived adults were born with developmental problems. Putting a small amount of arsenic back into the animals' diets completely reversed these effects. Dietary requirements for arsenic in...
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  • Heavy Metal Sources and Effects

    ALUMINIUM - alum, aluminum foil, animal feed, antacids, aspirin, auto exhaust, baking powder, beer, bleached flour, cans, ceramics, cheese, cigarette filters, color additives, construction materials, cookware, cosmetics, dental amalgams, deodorants, drinking water, drying agents, dust, insulated wiring, medicinal compounds, milk products, nasal spray, pesticides, pollution, salt, tap water, tobacco smoke, toothpaste, treated water, vanilla powder. EFFECTS: ALS, Alzheimer's, anemia, appetite...
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  • Sources of Heavy Metals

    In the previous email that you received a few days ago entitled "Heavy metals and Health" I talked a little about what heavy metals were and how prevalent they are in today's society. Perhaps you have been asking yourselves, “where do all these heavy metals come from,” given that they are everywhere around us, even up in the North and South poles? Remember that we mentioned that heavy metals have been implicated in various research studies to cause as many as 20% of learning disabilities,...
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  • Fish: Do I Eat, Do I Not Eat

    What's so healthy about eating fish? Fish is a high-protein, low-fat food that provides a range of health benefits. White-fleshed fish, in particular, is lower in fat than any other source of animal protein, and oilier fish contain substantial quantities of omega-3s, or the "good" fats in the human diet. In addition, fish does not contain the "bad" fats commonly found in red meat - called omega-6 fatty acids. Are fish contaminated? Despite their valuable qualities, fish can pose considerable...
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  • What are Heavy Metals

    Heavy metals have nothing to do with Rock and Roll music or bands – they are non-essential toxic metals that damage your health. Examples of these include aluminium, arsenic, antimony, cadmium, lead, mercury, nickel, thallium, uranium, polonium and others. Heavy metals are associated with many health problems – one of the main ways that they cause problems is by producing free radicals – nasty molecules in the body that damage cells, tissues and organs, as well as provoking the cell to mutate,...
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  • Poisoning our Children

    The World Wildlife Fund’s (WWF) biomonitoring survey in 2003 demonstrated that irrespective of where we live or what we do, we are all contaminated with a cocktail of toxic man-made chemicals. Some of these chemicals can adversely affect the brain and the peripheral nervous system. The most well-known are the ubiquitous pollutants, now banned, such as PCBs and DDT. Unfortunately, the chemical industry does not seem to have learned its lesson: there are many other man-made chemicals still being...
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  • Mercury – Multipotent cytotoxins

    Mercury is a multipotent cytotoxin that intervenes in the primary processes of the cell by bonding strongly with sulfhydryl and selenohydryl groups on albumen molecules in cell membranes, receptors and intracellular signal links, and by modifying the tertiary structure. The structure of albumen molecules is genetically determined, and this leaves ample scope for genetic polymorphism to manifest itself in varying sensitivity and types of reaction to mercury exposure. Mercury is toxic because it induces...
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  • Mercury: The Global Disaster

    Scientists around the world have shown how low levels of mercury toxicity is directly related to illnesses like cancer, heart disease and a host of neurological problems like Alzheimer’s, MS, ALS, autism spectrum disorders. It could also be playing an important role in the rapid increases we are seeing in diabetes - mercury attacks sulphur bonds in both insulin and insulin receptor sites. One only has to do a preliminary search of the literature and find 358 papers exemplifying the relationship...
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  • Killing Ourselves with Xenobiotics

    Toxic chemicals, otherwise known as “xenobiotics” (Gk: foreign to life) which are scattered all over our planet from the North Pole to the South Pole, are being constantly researched, and the conclusion is that they are extremely toxic to humans as well as wildlife. Even though some chemicals have been taken off the market, those that remain are even more noxious than the ones already banned. Bioaccumulation in soils, water supplies and the tissues of animals and humans is a real problem which...
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Showing 1– 10 of 22 results